7 new outdoor artworks arriving in 2021!

The beautiful and dramatic landscape of England’s Creative Coast has inspired artists for centuries. JMW Turner was captivated by Margate and its ever-changing seas and skies. The Essex and Sussex coast became a radical test-bed for 20th century architects, artists and writers, experimenting with new Modernist ideas. Today, artists continue to be inspired by this coastline and its communities.

In 2021, seven new site-specific artworks by seven international contemporary artists - Andreas Angelidakis, Mariana Castillo Deball, Holly Hendry, Jasleen Kaur, Katrina Palmer, Pilar Quinteros and Michael Rakowitz – connect the coastline of Essex, Kent and East Sussex and the world-class arts organisations in these places.​

Waterfronts is a new series of artworks, curated by Tamsin Dillon and set in the landscape of Margate, Folkestone, Hastings, Bexhill-on-Sea, Eastbourne, Gravesend and Southend-on-Sea. The artworks take the border between land and water as their inspiration. Each artist has responded to the uniqueness of the coastal locations, focusing on issues, stories and questions – social, natural, geological, political - to offer fresh perspectives on each place, for you to contemplate. The artworks will open sequentially - dates to be confirmed in due course. 

​In light of the current Covid19 situation, the England’s Creative Coast commission launches will now be in April 2021. 

Eastbourne

Eastbourne

Turner Contemporary presents Michael Rakowitz: ‘April is the cruellest month’ in Margate

Michael Rakowitz, The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, 2020

Michael Rakowitz, The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, 2020

Nasher Prize for Sculpture winner and Fourth Plinth artist, Rakowitz’s practice draws on the histories of buildings and objects, frequently revealing stories and connections between people and places from different times and places. For Waterfronts, Rakowitz will focus on connecting the social and geological histories of Margate, exploring coastal borders as places of conflict and migration, by linking the Kent seaside town with the Iraqi port of Basra in a new work entitled ‘April is the cruellest month’.

 

The De La Warr Pavilion presents Holly Hendry: ‘Invertebrate’, in Bexhill-on-Sea

Holly Hendry, Cenotaph, 2018, Jesmonite, concrete, oak, marble, stainless steel, Liverpool Biennial 2018. Photo credits - Pete Carr/ Thierry Bal

Holly Hendry, Cenotaph, 2018, Jesmonite, concrete, oak, marble, stainless steel, Liverpool Biennial 2018. Photo credits - Pete Carr/ Thierry Bal

Hendry makes sculptures and installations that give physical form to ideas around emptiness, edges, absence, flatness, fakes and forgeries. For Waterfronts, Hendry will investigate the precise boundary between land and water and the impact on one by the other. Her new work outside the Pavilion will connect with a simultaneous exhibition of her work inside the building.

 

Hastings Contemporary presents Andreas Angelidakis: ‘Seawall’ in Hastings.

Andreas Angelidakis, DEMOS, d14, collection Albertinum, Dresden. Photo Stathis Mamalakis. Courtesy the Breeder

Andreas Angelidakis, DEMOS, d14, collection Albertinum, Dresden. Photo Stathis Mamalakis. Courtesy the Breeder

For Waterfronts, Angelidakis is considering the encroaching ocean and the ongoing discussion around climate change, coastal erosion and the physical and political impact this has on a place as inspiration for his new work. He will use the human response to flooding through the invention of sea defence mechanisms to ask, ‘can the border between land and sea become a habitable place?’

 

Creative Folkestone presents Pilar Quinteros: ‘Janus’ Fortress: Folkestone’ in Folkestone, as part of Folkestone Triennial 2020.

Pilar Quinteros, Cathedral of Freedom, 2015. Courtesy of the artist

Pilar Quinteros, Cathedral of Freedom, 2015. Courtesy of the artist

Quinteros’ work is underpinned by an abiding interest in public spaces, the way they function and the diversity of human behaviour within them. She experiments with both structure and material, testing the boundaries, resilience and resistance of fragile and unstable materials. For Waterfronts, Quinteros presents ‘Janus’ Fortress Folkestone’, a new multifaceted work.

 

Towner Eastbourne presents Mariana Castillo Deball: ‘Walking through the town I followed a pattern on the pavement that became the magnified silhouette of a woman’s profile’ in Eastbourne

Mariana Castillo Deball, TO-DAY July 9th, 2016. Infinite Staircase Structure installed on a public space at Liverpool 1

Mariana Castillo Deball, TO-DAY July 9th, 2016. Infinite Staircase Structure installed on a public space at Liverpool 1

Deball’s diverse, kaleidoscopic practice combines visual art with archaeology, science and history to make installations, performances, sculptures and text-based pieces. She focuses on different forms and languages to reveal the role of objects and stories in our histories and identities. For Waterfronts, Deball will draw on both the ancient and more recent geological and social history of the area to create some new walking routes linking the town with the neighbouring South Downs.

 

Metal presents Katrina Palmer: ‘Hello’ and ‘Retreat’ in Southend-on-Sea, as part of Estuary 2020

Katrina Palmer, The Coffin Jump. Photo Danny Lawson PA

Katrina Palmer, The Coffin Jump. Photo Danny Lawson PA

Palmer works with stories that are distributed across found sites, audio environments, printed matter and performance. For Waterfronts, Palmer will explore and investigate the areas in and around Southend-on-Sea and look to reveal the way they are shaped by cultural, political, emotional and mechanical forces. This work will also form part of Estuary 2020.

 

Cement Fields presents Jasleen Kaur: ‘The first thing I did was to kiss the ground’ in Gravesend

Jasleen Kaur, I Keep Telling Them These Stories (your body as an instrument), 2018

Jasleen Kaur, I Keep Telling Them These Stories (your body as an instrument), 2018

In North Kent, Cement Fields presents Jasleen Kaur. Kaur’s work reconsiders the realities of materiality, usage and daily routine within the everyday things that surround us. Her refashioned objects are based on instinct and resourcefulness, reflecting a hybridity of national custom. Kaur’s new work for Waterfronts will be a response to the connections between the diverse communities in Gravesend and also forms part of Estuary 2020.

 

Play as you travel – the world’s first art GeoTour
Make your trip an active adventure – use our art geocaching tour to go off the traditional tourist track and uncover each town’s hidden gems and stories.

Geocaching is a GPS enabled digital treasure hunt. To play, download the app at www.geocaching.com, log in and using your location, find and collect the hidden geocaches of the England’s Creative Coast art GeoTour in and around each coastal town, created by the arts organisations and local people there. Move through the landscape, discover new places, solve the puzzles and uncover the intriguing local stories that make that place unique – the perfect activity to enjoy together on your trip.

Use this website to plan your trip to see these time-limited artworks and curate your own journey.